"In verbo veritatis" (2 Cor 6:7)

April 10, 2016

The Ordination of Women

Filed under: Essays, Uncategorized — Tags: — komonchak @ 1:38 pm

In November 1975, a conference in Detroit on the ordination of women attracted over a thousand participants. One of the results was the determination to hold similar conferences around the country. In the Spring of 1976, an all-day meeting on the topic was held in the Borough of Queens, in New York City, and I was invited to speak at it.

I constructed my talk as a commentary on a document issued in 1973 by the Committee on Pastoral Research and Planning of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops that gave various arguments against ordaining women to the priesthood. I rapidly reviewed seven of those arguments and offered my opinion about them.

Meanwhile, the acts of the Detroit Conference were being prepared for publication. Someone alerted the editor, Sr. Anne Marie Gardiner, to my paper and she expressed a desire to include my talk in the volume, but because it was so late in the editorial process, it could appear only as an appendix to that book, Women and Catholic Priesthood: An Expanded Vision (New York: Paulist Press, 1976). My essay also appeared in The Catholic Mind, 75 (1977) 13-28.

It was to such movements, of course, that subsequent magisterial statements were to respond.

You will find the essay here: JAK – Ordination of Women

Third Sunday in Eastertide

Filed under: Homilies — Tags: , , , — komonchak @ 12:15 pm

Third Sunday of Easter – April 22, 2007 – Blessed Sacrament

During the fifty days of Eastertide, which ought to have at least the same place in the awareness of Christians as the forty days of Lent, the Church tries to appropriate, make its own, realize, make real to itself the great blessings of the day which, as John Henry Newman said, “has made us greater than we know.” Easter is not the feast of the resuscitation of a corpse. It is the feast that marks the turning of the ages, that sets the great “Before-and-After” of human history, the end of the reign of sin and death, the triumph of love and life.
As usual we have an account of a resurrection-appearance of Christ. This one anticipates the life of the Church that will unfold in the future. (more…)

March 27, 2016

This is the Day the Lord has made!

Filed under: Homilies, Newman — Tags: , , , — komonchak @ 5:53 am

Easter Alleluia

          And now, to conclude, for it is hardly befitting on this Day to speak much, when God has done His greatest work. Let us think of it and of Him. Let us rejoice in the Day which He has made, and let us be “willing in the Day of His Power.” This is Easter Day. Let us say this again and again to ourselves with fear and great joy. As children say to themselves, “This is the spring,” or “This is the sea,” trying to grasp the thought, and not let it go; as travellers in a foreign land say, “This is that great city,” or “This is that famous building,” knowing it has a long history through centuries, and vexed with themselves that they know so little about it; so let us say, This is the Day of Days, the Royal Day, the Lord’s Day. This is the Day on which Christ arose from the dead; the Day which brought us salvation. It is a Day which has made us greater than we know. It is our Day of rest, the true Sabbath. Christ entered into His rest, and so do we. It brings us, in figure, through the grave and gate of death to our season of refreshment in Abraham’s bosom. We have had enough of weariness, and dreariness, and listlessness, and sorrow, and remorse. We have had enough of this troublesome world. We have had enough of its noise and din. Noise is its best music. But now there is stillness; and it is a stillness that speaks. We know how strange the feeling is of perfect silence after continued sound. Such is our blessedness now. Calm and serene days have begun; and Christ is heard in them, and His still small voice, because the world speaks not. Let us only put off the world, and we put on Christ. The receding from one is an approach to the other. We have now for some weeks been trying, through His grace, to unclothe ourselves of earthly wants and desires. May that unclothing be unto us a clothing upon of things invisible and imperishable! May we grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour, season after season, year after year, till He takes to Himself, first one, then another, in the order He thinks fit, to be separated from each other for a little while, to be united together for ever, in the kingdom of His Father and our Father, His God and our God.

John Henry Newman: “Difficulty of Realizing Sacred Privileges,”
Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 6, sermon 8)

       Let him easter in us,
be a dayspring to the dimness of us,
be a crimson-cresseted east.

G. M. Hopkins, “The Wreck of the Deutschland,” 35

February 16, 2016

Celibacy and Tradition

Filed under: Essays, Uncategorized — Tags: , — komonchak @ 3:51 pm

As the note on the page facing my page indicates, this essay originated as a study of the recent scholarly literature on the history of the discipline of sacerdotal celibacy.

JAK – Celibacy and Tradition

The Example of Henri de Lubac

Filed under: Essays — Tags: , — komonchak @ 12:04 pm

Here is an essay on the early theological work of the French Jesuit Henri de Lubac, S.J. I place it in the context of Church-world relations in mid-twentieth century theology.

JAK on de Lubac

April 24, 2015

Diversity and Disagreement

In 2003 I was honored to be invited to deliver the Fifth Annual Lecture of the Catholic Common Ground Initiative, which was then published as a pamphlet which you can find here, along with the response of Archbishop Daniel E. Pilarczyk.

JAK Diversity and Disagreement

Congar: Diversity and Divisions

Filed under: Foundations in Ecclesiology — Tags: , — komonchak @ 2:52 pm

In 1961, a year before Vatican II opened, Fr. Yves Congar gave a lecture on diversity and divisions within the Church that is still worth reading and pondering. Here is my translation of it:  Congar Diversity and Divisions

April 16, 2015

Redemptive Justice in Anselm’s “Cur Deus Homo”

Filed under: Essays — Tags: , , , — komonchak @ 10:20 am

This is one of the first articles I ever published. It appeared in a special issue of The Dunwoodie Review that represented a Festschrift in honor of Msgr. Myles M. Bourke.

JAK Redemptive Justice in Anselm

November 25, 2014

Modernity and the Construction of Roman Catholicism

Filed under: Essays, Vatican II — Tags: , — komonchak @ 4:24 pm

JAK Modernity & RCism

November 15, 2014

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

33rd Sunday of the Year – November 19, 1972 – CNR
The first reading in this evening’s Liturgy isn’t obviously connected with the others. It sings the praises of a faithful and industrious housewife. If we don’t think it is the only way for a woman to show her worth, it does show her displaying a nice balance of care for her family and concern for the poor. And its final praise is perhaps especially worth mention in an age which seems to have inverted proper values: “Charm is deceptive and beauty fleeting; the woman who fears the Lord is to be praised.” Need I add that the same thing is true of men?
Of the other readings, the Gospel parable might be taken as an illustration of the final lines of Paul’s letter: “All of you are children of light and of the day. We belong neither to darkness nor to night; therefore let us not be asleep like the rest, but awake and sober!” The parable of the rich man who went off on a journey and left his servants sums of money to be kept for him, was originally told by Jesus as an indictment of the religious leaders of his time. They were like the man who had received the money and then gone and buried it, out of fear of losing what had been entrusted to him. He received the master’s condemnation. His audience would have understood Jesus to be criticizing the Scribes for hoarding for themselves the Word of God they were given to care for, burying it in their restrictive and legalistic interpretations, preventing it from being a life-giving force. It is a classic indictment of the fearful conservative, who is so afraid of losing what he has that he buries or imprisons it, and so in effect kills it.

(more…)

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